2019-2020 Sociology Colloquium Series.

October 16th

Victoria Reyes, Assistant Professor of Sociology at UCR

“Global Borderlands: Fantasy, Violence and Empire in Subic Bay, Philippines”

The Center for Ideas and Society presents a book talk with Victoria Reyes, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology.

4-5:30pm

College Building South, 114

October 17th

Amy Kroska, Professor of Sociology at the University of Oklahoma,

“Information vs. Inspiration: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Illness Stigma-Reduction Messages.”

Numerous countries and communities have conducted campaigns aimed at reducing the stigma of mental illness.  Using an online experiment, we evaluate the relative effectiveness of three types of campaign messages (information about the biological origins of an illness, information about the psycho-social origins of an illness, and inspirational information about the competence of those with an illness) for reducing the perceived stigma (how I think others feel) and personal stigma (how I personally feel) tied to two illnesses (depression and schizophrenia). 

12:30-2pm

INTS 1109

October 24th

Two practice job talks

Jessica Moronez, PhD candidate in Sociology at UCR

“Carceral Care Work: Family Bond Maintenance Among Women of Color.”

Jessica Moronez’s work is based on an analysis of 35 in-depth interviews with women of color (primarily Latinas) who have been impacted by familial incarceration. Using an intersectional feminist perspective, her research examines the roles that women of color play in helping to maintain familial bonds and support their loved ones beyond the bars of correctional facilities.

Julisa McCoy, PhD candidate in Sociology at UCR

“Reproductive Rights on the Margins: Latinx Women’s Mobilization Around Reproductive Healthcare Politics in the Rio Grande Valley”

Julisa McCoy examines the socio-economic, political, cultural, and emotional processes that enable and constrain economically marginalized Latinx women’s mobilization around the politics of reproductive healthcare policy. Her research is based on 25 in-depth interviews with low-income Latinx women who have used publicly funded family planning programs in a south Texas border town of the Rio Grande Valley (RGV) where family planning cutbacks have been extensive. 

12:30-2pm

INTS 1109

October 30th

Emir Estrada, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Arizona State University

Dr. Estrada will present and discuss her new book, Kids at Work: Latinx Families Selling Food on the Streets of Los Angeles.  

*The Department of Sociology is co-sponsoring this event, which is being organized by the Ethnic Studies Department.

1pm

INTS 1111

October 31st

Two practice job talks — CANCELLED

November 14th

Stephanie Rickard, Professor of the Department of Government, London School of Economics

Incumbents Beware: The Impact of Offshoring on Elections

Sponsored by the UCR Center for Ideas and Society and organized by the Political Economy Seminar Series, which the Sociology Colloquium Committee is co-sponsoring.

3:10-5pm

HMNSS 1500

November 21st

Catherine Bozendahl, Associate Professor of Sociology at UC-Irvine

12:30-2pm

HMNSS 1500

“Beyond the Binary: Demographic Variation in and Political Behavioral Implications for New Measures of Gender Identity”

As a social construction, gender creates and maintains distinctions between the categories of “men” and “women” and organizes relations of inequality on the basis of these distinctions. Thus, societies frame men and women as two unequal categories, and this social fact has led to some of the largest and most consistent sources of categorical inequalities in politics and power. Theoretically, efforts to understand gender in social science have long acknowledged that gender is not binary and that it reflects a complex nexus of biology, interactions, culture, psychology, and institutions. Empirically, especially quantitatively in survey research, capacities have lagged far behind. We have seen a recent upsurge in new approaches to measuring gender in ways that move “beyond the binary.” I will discuss preliminary findings from two papers using Swedish and Dutch survey data that examine demographic differences in self-assessed non-binary gender traits and the relationship between gendered personality traits and political participation. Findings from these papers, and the special issue they will join, highlight the social construction of gender and the importance of capturing variation within those who claim the social identity categories of “women” and “men.”

December 3rd

Alfredo M. Mirandé, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at UCR

Book Signing Celebration

Gringo Justice: Insider Perspectives on Police, Gangs and Law edited by Professor Mirandé

*The Department of Sociology is co-sponsoring this event, which is being hosted by Chicano Latino Alumni & Chicano Student Program at UCR

Location: Zacatecas Restaurant in Riverside (Iowa and University)

Time: 5:30 pm ~ 8 pm

January 14th

“Harm Reduction in the Inland Empire”

This event is geared for students, faculty, and community members who are interested in harm reduction and would like to learn more about evidence-based approaches to reduce the health and social harms related to drug use. The event will feature speakers who have been instrumental in implementing harm reduction programs in Los Angeles, as well as representatives from the Inland Empire who are actively working on local harm reduction efforts.

5-7pm

INTS 1113

*co-sponsored by the Sociology Colloquia Committee

January 16th 

David Pettinicchio, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto 

“The Institutional and Organizational Context of Disability Rights: How Policy Made Citizens out of Clients”

How do institutions and organizations shape policy trajectories and what effects do they have on broader social change? Using the case of disability rights, I illustrate how fits and starts characteristic of American policy reform shape long-term interactions between government and citizens. For example, Medicaid funding of home care helps guarantee the right of people with disabilities to live free from isolating residential facilities. Yet, it remains optional. Numerous failed bipartisan attempts to fix this biased system mobilized professional advocacy organizations seeking to protect existing civil rights provisions.

Drawing on original archival and quantitative data, I examine how political entrepreneurs initially got disability rights onto the policy agenda and the kind of backlash it generated from opponents. Institutional stalemates and retrenchment played a major role in the development of a non-profit sector which became the basis of the modern disability rights movement. The disability rights case shines light on broader institutional arrangements that generate cycles of innovation, retrenchment, mobilization and restoration shaping the course of social change. More specifically, it points to the interplay between institutional “insiders” like legislators and regulators and “outsiders” like movement activists and organizational leaders that turned members of a group once treated exclusively as clients of the welfare state as citizens entitled to civil rights. The institutional and organizational context within which disability rights evolved has had important impacts on widely held attitudes and beliefs about disability so deeply entrenched in the American social, economic and political landscape.

12:30-2pm

INTS 1109

January 23rd

Barry Eidlin, Assistant Professor of Sociology at McGill University

“Why No Workplace Democracy in America?”

Modern U.S. workplaces are organized using a variety of schemas: teams, families, military squadrons, machines, even feudal monarchies and empires. But one schema remains largely off-limits: democracy. This absence of democracy in economic life contrasts sharply with political life, where democracy remains virtually the only appropriate organizing schema. As a result, most Americans live a paradox: they take for granted a set of democratic rights as citizens, but check them at the door every day when they show up for work.

Democracy’s inappropriateness for the workplace may not seem unusual today, but that was not always the case. Past generations of workers and policymakers drew much closer links between political and economic democracy. Understanding how and why those links frayed, then dissolved, can help explain the paradox of workplace (non-)democracy that most workers experience today.

Drawing on qualitative and quantitative research for my current book project, this talk will address three interrelated questions. First, why doesn’t democracy serve as an appropriate organizational schema for economic life today? Second, what did efforts to implement workplace democracy actually look like? Third, given unions’ central historical role as agents of workplace democracy, what model of union organization is more effective? Specifically, does more internal contention within unions help or hinder their ability to exercise control in the workplace?

12:30-2pm

HMNSS 1500

January 30th

Steven Boutcher, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Social Science Research at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

“Why No Workplace Democracy in America?”

Modern U.S. workplaces are organized using a variety of schemas: teams, families, military squadrons, machines, even feudal monarchies and empires. But one schema remains largely off-limits: democracy. This absence of democracy in economic life contrasts sharply with political life, where democracy remains virtually the only appropriate organizing schema. As a result, most Americans live a paradox: they take for granted a set of democratic rights as citizens, but check them at the door every day when they show up for work.

Democracy’s inappropriateness for the workplace may not seem unusual today, but that was not always the case. Past generations of workers and policymakers drew much closer links between political and economic democracy. Understanding how and why those links frayed, then dissolved, can help explain the paradox of workplace (non-)democracy that most workers experience today.

Drawing on qualitative and quantitative research for my current book project, this talk will address three interrelated questions. First, why doesn’t democracy serve as an appropriate organizational schema for economic life today? Second, what did efforts to implement workplace democracy actually look like? Third, given unions’ central historical role as agents of workplace democracy, what model of union organization is more effective? Specifically, does more internal contention within unions help or hinder their ability to exercise control in the workplace?

12:30-2pm

INTS 1109

February 6th

Wei Zhao, Associate Professor of Sociology and Organizational Science at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte

“Visible and Invisible Hands Intertwined: State-Market Symbiotic Interactions and Changing Income Inequality in Urban China”

Analyzing the restructured political economy in 21st-century urban China, this project develops a “symbiotic interaction” model and reconceptualizes the state-market relationship to appreciate the changing inequality patterns. As the state and market have formed a long-term, intimate relationship, dynamic state policies interact with the fragmented labor market to redefine a set of socioeconomic capital and status in affecting income inequality. Drawing empirical evidence from the Chinese General Social Survey 2003 and 2013 data, this paper employs linear and unconditional quantile regressions to compare income disparity patterns along both temporal and socio-spatial dimensions. The findings show that multiple key factors, including human capital (e.g., college education), political capital (e.g., party membership), occupational status (e.g., self-employment), and reformed organizations (e.g., state-owned enterprises), have all changed their economic returns over time and also played different roles for various earning groups. These findings suggest that we should conduct substantive institutional analyses of the evolving state-market relationship and their interplay to achieve a deeper understanding of the shifting stratification order in contemporary China. The developed framework also has theoretical significance and broad implications in the research of other transitional economies.

12:30-2pm

HMNSS 1500

February 13rd

Jessica Collett, Professor of Sociology at UCLA

“Meaning Making in Fatherhood: Role Models, Anti-Models, and Men’s Possible Selves”

Men continue to be under-involved in family life, particularly in light of growing expectations tied to “new fatherhood.” A dominant explanation for the gap between cultural ideals and fathers’ conduct, particularly for poor fathers, is a lack of role models. In this presentation, using data from in-depth qualitative interviews with low-income fathers, Dr. Collett shows that most of these men do draw on a role models to formulate their approach to parenting. However, many are using these models to demonstrate how not to be a father rather than as a positive model to emulate. Introducing the concept of anti-models, Dr. Collett explores the consequences of positive and negative orientations toward role models for men’s self-conceptions, meanings of fatherhood, and involvement in family life. 

12:30-2pm

INTS 1109

February 27th

Andrew Jorgenson, Professor of Sociology at Boston College

“Emissions, Inequality, and Human Well-Being”

In this talk Dr. Jorgenson will provide an overview of his ongoing collaborative research streams that focus on interconnections between anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and industrial pollution, forms of inequality, and human well-being.

12:30-2pm

INTS 1109

April 2nd

Edward Flores, Associate Professor of Sociology at UC-Merced

12:30-2pm (place TBA)

*co-sponsored by the Presley Center of Crime and Justice Studies

April 30th

Sarah Mustillo, Professor of Sociology at University of Notre Dame

12:30-2pm (place TBA)

*co-sponsored with School of Public Policy

May 7th 

Jean Beaman, Assistant Professor of Sociology at UC-Santa Barbara   

12:30-2pm (place TBA)

May 14th

Regin Firat, Assistant Professor of Sociology at UCR  

12:30-2pm (place TBA)