Ph.D. Students on the Market.

Phoenicia Fares

Research Interests: Social Interaction, Identity Processes, Digital Communication, Experimental and Quantitative Methodology

Dissertation Title: Social Interaction Across Digitally Mediated Social Platforms

Committee: Jan E. Stets (Chair), Rengin B. Firat, Jenny L. Davis

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Julisa McCoy

Research Interests: Gender, race/ethnicity, and class inequalities; social determinants of health; social policy; reproductive justice; social movements

Dissertation Title: The Politics of Reproductive Policy: Family Planning Policy Restrictions in the United States

Committee: Ellen Reese (Chair), Adalberto Aguirre, Jr., Bruce Link, and Amalia Cabezas

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Sarah Murray

Research Interests: Criminology, Gender, Gender and Police Agencies, Women and Work, Feminist Criminology, Qualitative Research

Dissertation Title: Intersectional Inequality Among Women Within Police Agencies

Committee: Sharon Oselin (chair), Ellen Reese, Randol Contreras

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Roberto Rivera

Research Interests: Critical Race Theory, Socio-Legal Studies, Restorative Justice, Sociology Disasters, Indigeneity, Crime and Global Climate Change

Dissertation Title: The Brown and Out of Policing in the United States: The Quest for a Holistic Policing Approach.

Current Research Project: Jamaica White: Mama Jamaica and Memories from a U.S. Fulbright Scholar.

Committee: Distinguished Professor Alfredo Mirande (Chair), Christopher Chase-Dunn, Randol Contreras, and Juanita Garcia

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Zeinab F. Shuker

Research Interests: Democratization Theories and Policy Research; Economic Inequality and Economic Development; Migration and Emigration; Qualitative and Quantitative Methods; The MENA Region; Oil Economies; Climate Change and The Energy Sector; Human Rights.

Biography: Zeinab Shuker is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on the political economy of the MENA region, with a special focus on Iraq’s past and present. Her dissertation — Political Hybridity: Boundaries and Economic Outcomes — develops a better understanding of the boundaries of hybrid regimes, systematically measures hybridity on a large panel of countries from 1990-2018, examines the impact of hybridity on economic growth and income inequality, and examines the degree to which particular hybrid institutions shape these relationships. She is presently developing a project that examines the relationship between oil dependency, state capacity, and climate change in the MENA region.

Dissertation Title: Political Hybridity: Boundaries and Economic Outcomes

Dissertation Abstract: My dissertation expands my research on the relationship between economic action and political outcomes, by examining the relationship between hybrid regimes and income inequality and economic growth. Hybrid regimes are defined as those regimes in the grey area between liberal democracies and authoritarian systems that emerged after the end of the Third Wave of democracy in the 1990s in many non-western countries. Research on the political economy of hybrid regimes follows three paths. The first path defines the boundaries around the term (Ekman 2009; Jayasuriya and Rodan 2007; Puhle 2005; Rotberg 2011; Wigell 2008). The second examines the survival and stability of these regimes (Brownlee 2009; Gandhi and Przeworski 2007). The third path examines the different political processes that lead to the formation of hybrid regimes (Merkel 2004). When it comes to the nature of the economic outcomes in these hybrid regimes, the research is still underdeveloped. My project develops a better understanding of the boundaries of hybrid regimes, systematically measures hybridity on a large panel of countries from 1990-2018, examines the impact of hybridity on economic growth and income inequality, and examines the degree to which particular hybrid institutions shape these relationships.

Current Research Project: I am currently developing a project that builds on my previous work by examining the relationship between oil dependency, state capacity, and climate change in the MENA region. Social scientists argue that oil rentier economies experience maldevelopment of their political systems. However, the nature of the political, economic, and social dysfunctions in oil rentier states is increasingly shaped by global climate change. In this project, I propose to examine the factors that determine the response of governments of oil-producing countries to climate change. I argue that the state’s ability to adopt new economic policies due to changes in the climate depends on four factors: state capacity, the presence and influence of environmental civil society organizations, regional stability, and the behavior of international oil corporations in the country.

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